You will never find a more wretched hive of ponies and buttercups.

The Best of The Week

Various sports media outlets today carried a mildly amusing story about the distress that Toronto Blue Jays pitcher J.A. Happ apparently feels about buying milk in Toronto. As a public service, here is a brief tutorial on the how and why of bagged milk.

In Canada, from Ontario east to the Maritimes, plain milk is commonly sold in, and consumed from, transparent or translucent plastic bags. Consumers can buy a set of three milk bags, totalling 4 litres (slightly more than one US liquid gallon), which come tightly packed into a larger poly bag. In order to use these bags, one must have a matching open-topped plastic milk pitcher. One does not directly use the floppy, flimsy bag. (Mr. Happ apparently missed out on this vital point, somewhat ironically as he is a pitcher.) Most eastern Canadian homes have several—the primary duty pitcher, plus at least one backup that gets used to wash soap from kids' hair, bail water, or to hold miscellaneous small items. Almost any…

When I was in residency, one of the obstetrics-gynecology faculty asked us, "Women died in childbirth. What did they die of?"

We were silent. Stumped. Infection? Well, when there was no infection control and the male physicians went from room to room with no hand washing, yes... but....

Preeclampsia? No. Not that common. Eclampsia? Ditto.

"What if a woman is in labor and the baby is stuck? What do they die of?"

Ick. "Bleeding?"

"…

An apparently-obsolete British idiom, meaning »a brawl, a fight«, particularly among somewhat genteel people who are meant to hold themselves above such crude things as fisticuffs. The idea is that when you punch a be-wiggéd man in the face, the first thing that happens is that his wig flies off and lands in the grass; besides being fairly typical of what Chesterton calls the theological joke, this rather conclusively dates the saying, to the…